The Goddess: Vajrayogini

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 November 1, 2019

Vajrayogini

 

(Photo Credit: The Divine Feminine Oracle Guidebook by Meggan Watterson)

Vajrayogini is considered to be the prime deity of the Tantric pantheon, the principal female deity of the Chakrasamvara Cycle of Yantras, and central to the practice of Vajrayogini Buddhism.

She is a Dakini (Tantric Priestess) and female Buddha, the complete essence of Buddhahood in female form, and is common to all Tibetan Buddhism schools.

Her red body symbolizes Her inner fire, while the flames surrounding her represent Her elevated wisdom and spiritual transformation. The ability to see with clarity in the future, as well as the present and past, is evident in Her third eye chakra.

(Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

She carries a bowl filled with blood, which represents the sacred blood of menstruation and birth. It also represents the clear light of bliss that can be attained by letting go of our attachment to ego.

There are different forms of Vajrayogini, each having a different name and appearance. Some of Her names are descriptive; some refer to Her lineage. The following examples are from the website himalyanart.org

Vajrayogini has been called the Buddha for our time, this time we live in with our busy, hectic lives, our myriad of problems and fears of work, paying our bills, the terrifying issues around the world. She is both peaceful and full of wrath. Vajrayogini is a meditation deity. She helps us to see the truth, free of our illusions, free of being selfish. She works always for others and their well-being and helps us to destroy us of our hanging on to our egos. Vajrayogini is easy to reach during our dark times. She is anxious to help us and bring us to Enlightenment.

You can meditate upon Her likeness, one of Her mandalas or chant Her mantra.

(Photo Credit: Pinterest)

There are several temples in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, dedicated to Vajrayogini, three of which are below. Sankhu Vajrayogini Temple, Guhyeshwari Temple and Vidhyeshvari Vajrayogini Temple.

 

(Photos from Wikipedia)

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The Goddess: Lalita

She Who Is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 May 1, 2019

Lalita, the Red Goddess

(Image Credit: The Divine Feminine Oracle Deck by Meggan Watterson)

Lalita Tripura Sundari, also known as Lalita, is an Hindu Goddess, connected to playfulness and desire.

Lalita is “She Who Plays”. Her name in Sanskrit is comprised of Lila, meaning “divine play”, Tripura, meaning three worlds, and Sundari, meaning beautiful; hence, Tripura Sundari is “She who is beautiful in three worlds”. She is known for Her spontaneity and joy.

Lalita is part of a group of ten Goddesses called the Mahavidyas, or Great Wisdom. She is seen to be an aspect of manifestation of Parvati, as well as “Adi Parashakti”, a Goddess considered a Supreme Being in the Shaktism sect of Hinduism.

(Image Credit: Wikipedia)

Lalita is sometimes seen sitting upon a lotus of 16 petals and is known as the Fulfiller of all Desires. Her devotional text, the Lalita Sahasranamam, is a list of her 1,000 names that fulfills the desires of those reciting it.

She holds a golden bow, which represents the wind and five golden arrows to represent the five senses. Her forehead is sometimes shown with a crescent moon.

Her yantra (mystical diagram/sacred geometry) is a red flower, symbolizing Her as the Red Goddess.

(Image Credit: yes2spirituality.wordpress.com)

According to Meggan Watterson of The Divine Feminine Oracle, Lalita represents the waking, dreaming, deep sleep states of our consciousness. She helps us to find joy in our own consciousness and within the world.

(Image Credit: journeyingtothegoddess.wordpress.com)

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The Goddess: Akhilanda

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 March 1, 2019

Akhilanda

(artwork by Pieter Weltevrede)

Akhilanda is the Hindu Goddess of Never Not Broken. Her formal name is Akhilandeswari Ma, and is known informally as Khodiyar Ma, a form of the Great Mother Goddess.

In Sanskrit, Akhilanda means “never not broken” and Ishwari is Goddess or female power. She is one of India’s oldest depictions of the Goddess.

She is said to be originally a Vedic Goddess, the Vedas being the oldest layer of Sanskrit scripture. She is also known as the Goddess of the “agamas”, the texts known as tantra. She has been described as a form of the Goddess Parvati and as associated with Goddess Durga.

She carries a trident and stands upon a crocodile upon a rushing river.

(Image credit: hinduismtoday.com)

“Everything happens for my liberation. I choose to become only more love” – Divine Feminine Oracle

She moves and allows herself to be moved by the motion of the crocodile upon the rushing waters of the river. She surrenders herself to the movement.

(Image Credit: MEDIUM.COM)

Her power comes from being pulled apart and coming back together again; always broken, so she can never BE broken. She is destroyed (broken) and created/re-created again and again.

Akhilanda represents where we are broken, our pieces instead of our whole. The crocodile is our fears, our vulnerabilities.

She teaches us that our power is in our pain and that we have the strength and ability to pull ourselves back together, again and again, after breaking. We re-create and rebuild ourselves over and over into whom we wish to be.

Akhilandra is there to help us transition from one place to another after we are hurt, when we feel sadness, when we have suffered loss. She assists us to grow, to transform, to heal and mend those broken bits and pieces. Just as she surrenders to the motion of the crocodile and the waters of the river, so we should surrender to whatever we are feeling, trusting that we will once again be whole.

***

The Goddess: Hygiea

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 February 1, 2019

Hygiea

(Image Credit: Amazon)

Hygiea, the daughter of Epione, the Goddess of the Soothing of Pain, and Aslepius, God of Medicine, is the Greek Goddess of Health and Healing. Hers is a healing family, as Her sisters are Panakeia, the Goddess Who Cures All and Iaso, the Goddess of Remedies.

Called Salus in Rome, She is also the healer of both physical and mental disease. She is sometimes called the Protectress of Mental Health.

Her symbol is a cup, or chalice, surrounded by a snake, as She is most commonly shown with a snake wrapped around Her body, holding a bowl for libations.

The cult of Hygiea started in the 600’s BCE and spread during the plague of the 400’s BCE. A statue of Her stood at the entrance of the Acropolis, along with Athene.

Hygiea was very holistic in Her approach to good health, professing the benefits of eating well, getting enough exercise and the concept of disease prevention from cleanliness and hygiene, from whose name comes the words and its’ variations.

We would do well to follow Her advice in the present day, as well.

(Image Credit: earthandstarryheavens.com)

The Goddess: Aa

She Who Is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 January 1, 2019

Aa

(Image Credit: freedom for humanity2016.wordpress.com)

She to whom January 1st is dedicated and to whom is honored on this day is the Babylonian Goddess, Aa.

She is also known as:

Great Mother

Mother of All Things

Goddess of the Dawn

Goddess of the Light

While She is known as Aa in Babylonia, She is also known as Serida in Sumeria, and in Akkadian as Aya, which means “dawn” in Akkadian.

She is “the Beginning” and “The Mother of All Wisdom” and is associated with the eastern mountains which bring the sun into the sky.

(Image Credit: earthandstarryheaven.com)

Her symbol is an 8-rayed sphere representing the symbol of light. As the consort of Shamash, the god of the sun, She was also called Bride of the Sun. Her sacred marriage to Shamash brought all thing to grow and prosper.

Aa brings the energy from the dawning of the sun on a new day.

(Image Credit: historymaniac.megan.com)

Other Goddesses who have their feast days in January include:

January 2 – Inanna’s Day (Sumerian)

January 5 – Kore’s Day (Greek)

January 8 – Justicia’s Day (Roman)

January 11 – Carmentalia (Roman)

January correspondences:

Gem/Birthstone: Garnet

Full Moon – Cold Moon

Herb – Thyme

Color – White

Tree – Birch

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The Goddess: Agischanak

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 December 1, 2018

AGISCHANAK

 

As I sit here looking out at the world outside my window, covered with the first snowfall of the season, wrapped in a shawl due to the cold. My thoughts turn to Alaska and what Goddess I may find there.

 

My search brings me to Agischanak.

Goddess of the

Mountains.

Goddess of the

Earth.

Protector of Her

people.

 

(Image Credit: hubpages.com)

 

Agischanak is a Goddess in Southeastern Alaska. She lives on top of Mt. Edgecumbe, near Sitka.

 

(Image Credit: listverse.com)

 

She is kindly and protects Her people and all of the peoples of the Earth. However, She is also forceful and powerful, as She must be as it is She who supports the pillar on which the Earth rests.

 

For visitors, She has her brother, who comes but once a year to bring her the news of the world. The trickster, Raven, also comes to visit, always attempting to woo Her away, thereby abandoning Her post. Of course, it is a post She does not abandon. Raven provokes and annoys her at his own peril, as she responds with earthquakes.

 

It is cold where Agischanak is holding up the Earth, and Her people come to Her and light roaring fires, as an offering, to keep Her warm.

 

Remember, were it not for Agischanak, the Earth would sink into the powerful depths of the ocean.

 

(Image Credit: liminallandscapes.com)

The Goddess: Sedna

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names
Susan Morgaine November 1, 2018

SEDNA

(Image Credit: yousense.info)

The story of Sedna, the Mother and Mistress of the Sea, the Goddess of marine mammals, is, to me, one of sadness and betrayal.

In the Arctic Ocean of the Inuits, Sedna lived with her family. She was very beautiful and was wooed by many in Her community. She refused them, one and all. Her father, taking matters into his own hands, gave Her to an unknown hunter, in return for fish to keep the rest of his family fed. This unknown hunter was, in reality, a bird-spirit, and whisked Sedna away while She was asleep.

Another version states that Sedna went with the unknown hunter of Her own free will, as he promised Her a life filled with everything She could dream of – warmth, and food.

Either way, to Her dismay, Her new home was not as promised, as She found herself awakening on a high cliff, in a nest, surrounded by birds.

She got a message to Her father of Her plight. Her father, Anguta, attempted to help Her by putting Her into his kayak to return Her to their home. The birds, seeing this, flew after them, surrounded the kayak, seeking vengeance for the removal of Sedna from the nest.

To save himself, Anguta, threw his daughter overboard. She reached for the side of the kayak to save Herself and Her father cut off her fingers. As She brought her arms up to reach into the kayak, he then cut off Her arms. Sedna sank to the bottom of the sea.

(Image Credit: Hanie Mold/Pernastudios – Deviant.com)

She became the Queen and the Goddess of the Deep, Her fingers and arms becoming the seals, walruses, whales, those ocean mammals most hunted by the Intuit.

Sedna lived, then, beneath the waves, in the Kingdom of Adlivan, the Intuit Land of the Dead, in a home-made of stone and the ribs of whales. She was responsible for sending the sea creatures to the human hunters to feed their families. She took Her responsibility seriously, but She had a provision that when one of them died, their souls would stay with their bodies for three days, whereupon they would bring news to Sedna of how the people behaved. If any of Her laws were broken, She would not send the food to the hunters. This brought Her pain.

When this happened, a Shaman had to visit Her, by passing through terrifying lands and tests, to heal and soothe Her, until Her pain had passed and things were put right once more.


Sculpture of Sedna in Nuuk, Greenland

(Image Credit: alamy.com)

**My fingers were cut off then

I was kicked

I was hurt

I was wounded

I was lied to

I was betrayed

I was abandoned

My suffering was great

but down below in the deeps

in the heart of the ocean

where I was left to lie

I realized my powerlessness

the way my life was lived

helpless and afraid

always being done to

instead of doing

and saw what I did

As realization expanded my

consciousness

fish and sea mammals

grew out of my cut fingers

I became “old food dish”

She who provided for her people

Victim no more**

**From “The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky. Image credit also goes to “The Goddess Oracle”.

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The Goddess: Dzivaguru

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 October 1, 2018

Dzivaguru

(Photo Credit: patientenbetelligung.info)

 

This Mother Earth Goddess was of the Shona-speaking Korekore peoples of Zimbabwe.

She was the Goddess of Earth and the Darkness of Night. It was She who controlled the clouds and the rain, and the pools and the streams.

Dzivaguru was kind and compassionate toward her people. She brought the rain, and with the help of her two beautiful, golden Sunbirds, She brought the sun. Because of Her, Her land was fruitful and abundant.

She lived in a palace which was on an ancient lake. She walked freely, and often, amongst her meadows and forests, drinking from her magical cornucopia, which brought Her everything She could ever wish for.

There came a time when the Sky God’s son, Nosenga, became jealous of Her land and Her wealth. He wanted all that She had and so, decided to just take it from Her.

Dzivaguru was smart, however, and knew his plans, and so concealed all of Her wealth and lands in fog to conceal it. He used a magic ribbon to see and was able to finally find Her palace.

She tried to flee but he set a trap for Her by trapping Her two beautiful Sunbirds, bringing the

sunshine.

(Photo Credit: Offbeat Mythology Wiki)

 

Dzivaguru was angered by Nosenga’s actions. He had Her Sunbirds and he took Her lands. She left, but not before taking Her lake, and with it, Her control over the waters and the rain.

She cursed him, saying that his worship would be short-lived and that because he stole Her birds, that the sun would never set and the lands would be parched and cracked because She would not bring the rains. Thus, She disappeared. To this day, Her people still call out to her for rain.

(Photo Credit: medium.com)

The Goddess: Goddesses Who Protect Travelers

She Who Is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

 September 1, 2018

Goddesses Who Protect Travelers

As we begin to look forward to September and the first day of Fall, we remember that, for now, it is still Summer. This means there is still plenty of time to take a vacation and travel.

With that being said, this column looks at three Goddesses who will protect you on your journeys far and wide.

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(Graphic: bonstore.org)

CHAM MO LAM LHA

Cham Mo Lam Lha is the Tibetan Goddess of Travelers. She is a worldly protectress who rode on the back of a bee to insure smooth travel.

She not only will help with outward traveling, but also the travel of an inward spiritual journey

(Graphic: Pinterest)

ABEONA

Abeona is the Roman Goddess of Outward Journeys and Safe Passage. She protects travelers on their departure. She also guides and protects the first steps of children, as well as their first steps away from home.

Abeona’s name means “to depart, or to go forth”. As such, She is also the Goddess of Partings.

(Graphic: religion.wikia.com)

ADEONA/ADIONA

Adiona is the Roman Goddess of Safe Return. She protects travelers on the arrival back home. She also protects children, as they leave home and reassure parents that they will return home, at least to visit.

Her name means “to approach or to visit”.

Abeona and Adiona are both thought to be aspects of Juno due to their special focus on children. These two Goddesses worked together protecting travelers as they departed and made sure that they returned home safely.

May you be blessed on your adventures and travels and may these Goddesses of travel watch over you on your journeys.

Blessings!

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